Heather Lynn

Heather Lynn spent years on the border between life and death. Two of her children were designated Miracle Kids for Children’s National Hospital in Washington, D.C. Although unrelated medical issues, both defied every prognosis and are thriving today. The pain of almost losing them changed her perspective on the world. These traumas and their related miracles are in her every brush stroke. Painting has helped Heather work through some of this darkness and embrace the silver linings of life.

Heather creates large-scale abstract paintings that are composed of bright tones, or contrasting colors, complemented by a dense texture. Lynn’s background in photography and ceramics help inform her practice. Deeply influenced by her environment, her eyes serve as a lens in synthesizing images. Heather’s roots in three-dimensional ceramics appear in the creation of her mediums. She initially engages natural elements – sand, grass, clay, and dirt – with recycled or found industrial materials to create rich textures. Lynn then adds gesso to her canvas, wood panel or board followed by the application of the raw materials with spatulas and knives. Five to eight layers of underpainting are then applied to create a thick undulating surface. More paint is then added.

Heather’s inspiration often comes from a restless night’s sleep: the colors, shapes and movement float as she emerges into consciousness. Such elements contribute to her style – loose but connected – and are recognizable throughout her body of work. She also enjoys playing with the contradiction of opposites and knows how to manipulate value, tone, and composition to this effect. She sees the world in a constant state of such dichotomies – turmoil and beauty, peace and peril, harmony and disaster – which is reflected in Lynn’s work.
Due to Heather’s children’s’ medical experiences, she walks through life with an altered perspective. She tries to approach all things in her life with love, kindness, and appreciation and infuse such values in her art. Heather likes her work to feel ethereal yet have a subtle dark component. Her artistic intent is to create a feeling of memory as opposed to a memory of a specific place. She hopes such sentiment shifts the way in which people see themselves and the world – beautifully flawed and impossibly kind.

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